The Haunted Rocket™ Rocket 13
pulpcovers:

The Big Binge http://ift.tt/19toVP2
pulpcovers:

Star Base X http://ift.tt/1bB9nIH
greggorysshocktheater:

Publicity photo of Rod Serling for Night Gallery

greggorysshocktheater:

Publicity photo of Rod Serling for Night Gallery

victoriousvocabulary:

VITA NOVA
[phrase]
1. Latin: “New Life”, also La Vita Nuova - “The New Life”.
2. a text written by Dante Alighieri in 1295 - it was an expression of the mediaeval genre of courtly love in a prosimetrum style (a literary piece made up of alternating passages of prose and poetry).
[Maciej Wierzbicki]

victoriousvocabulary:

VITA NOVA

[phrase]

1. Latin: “New Life”, also La Vita Nuova - “The New Life”.

2. a text written by Dante Alighieri in 1295 - it was an expression of the mediaeval genre of courtly love in a prosimetrum style (a literary piece made up of alternating passages of prose and poetry).

[Maciej Wierzbicki]

victoriousvocabulary:

ZOOPERY
[noun]
the performing of experiments on animals, especially the lower animals.
Etymology: Ancient Greek zoo- (zoon - animal) + -pery (from peiran - to experiment).
[source]

victoriousvocabulary:

ZOOPERY

[noun]

the performing of experiments on animals, especially the lower animals.

Etymology: Ancient Greek zoo- (zoon - animal) + -pery (from peiran - to experiment).

[source]

browsethestacks:

Worlds Of Fear (1952-1953)

classictrek:

Front and back covers for Star Trek II Short Stories and Star Trek III Short Stories, a pair of books aimed at the young readers’ market. None of the writing is the stuff of legend, but it’s competent and better than quite a few of the novels aimed at adults.

browsethestacks:

Office Chair Ghost Rider by bear65

browsethestacks:

Office Chair Ghost Rider by bear65

John Constantine by Ben Oliver

John Constantine by Ben Oliver

victoriousvocabulary:

ESEMPLASY
[noun]
1. unification; to make into one.
2. the unifying power of imagination.
Etymology: supposedly invented by romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge  (1772-1834) from the Greek eis ev plattein, “make or shape into one”.
[Victo Ngai - Captain Nemo]

victoriousvocabulary:

ESEMPLASY

[noun]

1. unification; to make into one.

2. the unifying power of imagination.

Etymology: supposedly invented by romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge  (1772-1834) from the Greek eis ev plattein, “make or shape into one”.

[Victo Ngai - Captain Nemo]

victoriousvocabulary:

SYBILLINE [also SIBYLLINE]
[adjective]
1. coming from, characteristic of, or relating to a sibyl, i.e. a female prophet.
2. prophetic; oracular; making pronouncements or predictions as if by special inspiration or authority.
3. having a secret or hidden meaning; obscure; mysterious; cryptic.
Etymology: Latin Sibyllīnus pertaining to a sibyl, ultimately from ultimately from Greek Sibulla.
[Marat Ars]

victoriousvocabulary:

SYBILLINE [also SIBYLLINE]

[adjective]

1. coming from, characteristic of, or relating to a sibyl, i.e. a female prophet.

2. prophetic; oracular; making pronouncements or predictions as if by special inspiration or authority.

3. having a secret or hidden meaning; obscure; mysterious; cryptic.

Etymology: Latin Sibyllīnus pertaining to a sibyl, ultimately from ultimately from Greek Sibulla.

[Marat Ars]

Rudolfsteam by Felideus

"Behold the Ingenious Rudolfsteam Sled Apparatus, the extraordinary vehicle designed in 1880 by Sire Nicholas Sinterklaas Noël. An extremly contaminant, unconfortable and beautiful device feeded by a magic mushroom engine."

Rudolfsteam by Felideus

"Behold the Ingenious Rudolfsteam Sled Apparatus, the extraordinary vehicle designed in 1880 by Sire Nicholas Sinterklaas Noël. An extremly contaminant, unconfortable and beautiful device feeded by a magic mushroom engine."

Monster Rally by MarcoBucci

Monster Rally by MarcoBucci

Baby Predator

Wondercon 2014

Baby Predator

Wondercon 2014

victoriousvocabulary:

VIZARD
[noun]
a mask or visor; a disguise.
Etymology: alteration of Middle English viser ”mask, visor”.
[Patrick Seymour]

victoriousvocabulary:

VIZARD

[noun]

a mask or visor; a disguise.

Etymology: alteration of Middle English viser ”mask, visor”.

[Patrick Seymour]