The Haunted Rocket™ Rocket 13
Space Invaders by Stephanie Hans

Space Invaders by Stephanie Hans

vintagetoyarchive:

GILBERT: 1965 JAMES BOND 007 Action Figure

vintagetoyarchive:

GILBERT: 1965 JAMES BOND 007 Action Figure

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Jacob Marley (1836)
Jacob Marley, partner in the counting house Marley & Scrooge, passed away on  Christmas Eve, 176 years ago. Little is known about Mr. Marley’s childhood and upbringing. 
The counting house that Marley and Scrooge established would eventually earn them to a seat on the London Stock Exchange. Their reputation within the business community was unparalleled, if not always positive. They worked endlessly and with little regard to their customers or competitors; more worried about earning the next shilling than the welfare of those around them.
After Marley’s death in 1836, Scrooge took over sole proprietorship of the counting house. (In an acknowledgement of Scrooge’s tight-fisted ways, he did not commission a new sign but simply crossed off Marley’s name to save a few pounds.) Although hardly to be believed, Scrooge’s behavior was even worse following the death of his partner. Known throughout Londontown as a stingy miser, he treated others with utter disdain and cared nothing but for the money he earned.
It was long rumored (and furthered by the author Charles Dickens) that the ghost of Mr. Marley appeared to Ebenezer Scrooge on Christmas Eve, 1843. On that night he warned Scrooge that the life they led would only bring about eternal pain. Their success at businessmen at the expense of people had forced Marley to wander the earth draped in chains, money boxes, and keys atoning for his sins. The story, as recounted by Mr. Dickens, then tells that three additional ghosts visited Mr. Scrooge: The Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future.
As ludicrous as the story appears, on Christmas Day Mr. Scrooge was a new man. Kind to all, generous, and always seen with a smile. He even paid for a new sign and promoted his clerk, Mr. Robert “Bob” Cratchit, to partner. Mr. Scrooge would never confirm Mr. Dickens’ tale but if asked he would respond with a knowing smirk.
You can find a free copy of Mr. Dickens’ account that fateful Christmas Eve here.
Merry Christmas from Obit of the Day!
(Image Marley’s ghost, from Charles Dickens: A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. With Illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First edition. Courtesy of Wikipedia.org)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Jacob Marley (1836)

Jacob Marley, partner in the counting house Marley & Scrooge, passed away on  Christmas Eve, 176 years ago. Little is known about Mr. Marley’s childhood and upbringing.

The counting house that Marley and Scrooge established would eventually earn them to a seat on the London Stock Exchange. Their reputation within the business community was unparalleled, if not always positive. They worked endlessly and with little regard to their customers or competitors; more worried about earning the next shilling than the welfare of those around them.

After Marley’s death in 1836, Scrooge took over sole proprietorship of the counting house. (In an acknowledgement of Scrooge’s tight-fisted ways, he did not commission a new sign but simply crossed off Marley’s name to save a few pounds.) Although hardly to be believed, Scrooge’s behavior was even worse following the death of his partner. Known throughout Londontown as a stingy miser, he treated others with utter disdain and cared nothing but for the money he earned.

It was long rumored (and furthered by the author Charles Dickens) that the ghost of Mr. Marley appeared to Ebenezer Scrooge on Christmas Eve, 1843. On that night he warned Scrooge that the life they led would only bring about eternal pain. Their success at businessmen at the expense of people had forced Marley to wander the earth draped in chains, money boxes, and keys atoning for his sins. The story, as recounted by Mr. Dickens, then tells that three additional ghosts visited Mr. Scrooge: The Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future.

As ludicrous as the story appears, on Christmas Day Mr. Scrooge was a new man. Kind to all, generous, and always seen with a smile. He even paid for a new sign and promoted his clerk, Mr. Robert “Bob” Cratchit, to partner. Mr. Scrooge would never confirm Mr. Dickens’ tale but if asked he would respond with a knowing smirk.

You can find a free copy of Mr. Dickens’ account that fateful Christmas Eve here.

Merry Christmas from Obit of the Day!

(Image Marley’s ghost, from Charles Dickens: A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. With Illustrations by John Leech. London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First edition. Courtesy of Wikipedia.org)

oldprojectionroom:

Planeta Bur - Planet of Storms (1962)

oldprojectionroom:

Planeta Bur - Planet of Storms (1962)

thebristolboard:

Classic cover for Werewolf By Night #12 by John Romita Sr. Published by Marvel Comics, December 1973.

thebristolboard:

Classic cover for Werewolf By Night #12 by John Romita Sr. Published by Marvel Comics, December 1973.

twicr:

If Soviet Russia had ignited the robot uprising, these would likely be your  creepy robot overlord comrades. 

70sscifiart:

Dean Ellis

70sscifiart:

Dean Ellis

vintagetoyarchive:

UNIROYAL: 1967 NAUGA MONSTER Red Glitter Naugahyde Doll

vintagetoyarchive:

UNIROYAL: 1967 NAUGA MONSTER Red Glitter Naugahyde Doll

victoriousvocabulary:

LA BELLE AU BOIS DORMANT
[noun]
French: sleeping beauty - a classic fairytale involving a beautiful princess, enchantment of sleep, and a handsome prince.
Etymology: French, translation ”The Beauty sleeping in the Wood”.
[Maxfield Parrish]

victoriousvocabulary:

LA BELLE AU BOIS DORMANT

[noun]

French: sleeping beauty - a classic fairytale involving a beautiful princess, enchantment of sleep, and a handsome prince.

Etymology: French, translation ”The Beauty sleeping in the Wood”.

[Maxfield Parrish]

victoriousvocabulary:

LICORNE
[noun]
French: unicorn - a fabled creature symbolic of virginity and usually represented as a horse with a single straight spiraled horn projecting from its forehead.
Etymology: from Old French unicorne, probably a contraction of l’unicorne “the unicorn”.
[Steve Roberts]

victoriousvocabulary:

LICORNE

[noun]

French: unicorn - a fabled creature symbolic of virginity and usually represented as a horse with a single straight spiraled horn projecting from its forehead.

Etymology: from Old French unicorne, probably a contraction of l’unicorne “the unicorn”.

[Steve Roberts]

victoriousvocabulary:

AEROUANT
[noun]
Celtic (Breton): dragon - typically an imaginary animal that can breathe out fire and resembles a very large lizard with wings, a long tail, and large claws.
[Julie Bell & Boris Vallejo]

victoriousvocabulary:

AEROUANT

[noun]

Celtic (Breton): dragon - typically an imaginary animal that can breathe out fire and resembles a very large lizard with wings, a long tail, and large claws.

[Julie Bell & Boris Vallejo]

don56:

Brigitte Helm in ‘Metropolis’ 1927

don56:

Brigitte Helm in ‘Metropolis’ 1927

Ragyo Kiryuin (Kill La Kill)

Cosplay by Kiga Tymianski

Photography by Paul Hillier Photography

Ragyo Kiryuin (Kill La Kill)

Cosplay by Kiga Tymianski

Photography by Paul Hillier Photography

Kal-If-Fee by Otis Frampton

Kal-If-Fee by Otis Frampton